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 Choices For Voice And/Or Data T1 Service Equipment

Written by: S. Sullivan - Mar 23, 2018

1) Router - A device that forwards data packets along networks. A router is connected to at least two networks, commonly two LANs or WANs or a LAN and its ISPís network. Routers are located at gateways, the places where two or more networks connect. Routers use headers and forwarding tables to determine the best path for forwarding the packets, and they use protocols such as ICMP to communicate with each other and configure the best route between any two hosts. A WIC (WAN interface card) is needed to deliver T1 service.

2) CSU/DSU - Acronym for 'Channel Service Unit / Data Service Unit'. The CSU is a device that connects a terminal to a digital line. Typically, the two devices are packaged as a single unit. The DSU is a device that performs protective and diagnostic functions for a telecommunications line. You can think of it as a very high-powered and expensive modem. Such a device is required for both ends of a T-1 or T-3 connection, and the units at both ends must be set to the same communications standard. Most routers these days have CSU/DSU functionality built in.

3) PBX - Acronym for 'Private Branch Exchange', a private telephone network used within an enterprise. Users of the PBX share a certain number of outside lines for making telephone calls external to the PBX. Most medium-sized and larger companies use a PBX because it's much less expensive than connecting an external telephone line to every telephone in the organization. In addition, it's easier to call someone within a PBX because the number you need to dial is typically just 3 or 4 digits. A new variation on the PBX theme is the centrex, which is a PBX with all switching occurring at a local telephone office instead of at the company's premises. Usually a DTI drop & insert card is required to interface with the T1.

4) Channel Bank - A channel bank is the foundation for all digital telecommunication transmissions. It is the part of a carrier multiplex terminal that multiplexes a group of channels into a higher bit-rate digital channel and demultiplexes these aggregates back into individual channels. A channel bank changes analog voice and data signals into a digital format. It is called a "bank" because it can contain enough processing power to convert a bank of up to 24 individual channels to a digital format, and then back to analog again. The 24 channels comprise a full T1 circuit. A channel bank can also multiplex a group of channels into a higher bandwidth analog channel.

5) IAD - Acronym for 'Integrated Access Device'. An IAD is a customer premises device that provides access to wide area networks and the Internet. Specifically, it aggregates multiple channels of information including voice and data across a single shared access link to a carrier or service provider PoP (Point of Presence). The access link may be a T1 line, a DSL connection, a cable (CATV) network, a broadband wireless link, or a metro-Ethernet connection. At the PoP, the customer's aggregated information is typically directed into a MSPP (multiservice provisioning platform), which is a complex and expensive device that sits between customers and the core network. It manages traffic streams coming from customers and forwards those streams to the PSTN (voice) or appropriate wide area networks (ATM, frame relay, or the Internet). An IAD is sometimes installed by the service provider that a customer wishes to connect with. This allows the service provider to control the features of the access link and manage its operation during use. Competitive service providers are now offering access services over a variety of access technologies, including wireless optical (i.e., Terabeam) and metro-Ethernet networks. Old telco protocols and transport methods (T1 lines and time division multiplexing) are replaced with access methods that are appropriate for the underlying transport. Because of this, the provider will usually specify an appropriate IAD, or install an IAD.

6) Predictive Dialer - A predictive dialer is a computerized system that automatically dials batches of telephone numbers for connection to agents assigned to sales or other campaigns. Predictive dialers are mostly used in outbound call centers. Predictive dialers were developed from the autodialer. While the basic autodialer merely automatically dials telephone numbers for call center agents who are idle or waiting for a call, the predictive dialer uses a variety of algorithms to predict both the availability of agents and called party answers, adjusting the calling process to the number of agents it anticipates (or predicts) will be available when the calls it places are expected to be answered. The predictive dialer monitors the answers to the calls it places, detecting how the calls it makes are answered. It discards unanswered calls, engaged numbers, disconnected lines, answers from fax machines, answering machines and similar automated services, and only connects calls answered by people to waiting sales representatives. Thus, it frees agents from listening to unanswered or unsuccessful calls.